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Tool Library

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Scott I saw your idea about tools being shared by perhaps an app that's shared throughout the community.  It got me thinking that an industrial sized "tool shed" could function much like a public library, where users within the community have stickers or some sort of identifying marker that allows them to rent the tools they need for home renovations, landscaping, etc.  It would create jobs as well to work within the facility, and to clean it.

Quote from jdunn85 on August 20, 2018, 6:56 pm

Scott I saw your idea about tools being shared by perhaps an app that's shared throughout the community.  It got me thinking that an industrial sized "tool shed" could function much like a public library, where users within the community have stickers or some sort of identifying marker that allows them to rent the tools they need for home renovations, landscaping, etc.  It would create jobs as well to work within the facility, and to clean it.

When Scott was talking about the robot vacuums, I was thinking, how much money could be saved simply by having a few vacuums everyone can use from rather than each person having to have their own? The cheapest upright vacuum I was finding online at the retail store websites was around $35. If we assume 1,000 people in a community for ease, then maybe the whole community could get away with around 10 shared vacuums. The shared vacuums would come to a total cost of $350, while that cost if every person had to buy their own would be $35,000. That's a difference of $34,650 just for vacuums! If you take that $350 and divide it by 1,000, you're talking 35 cents per person even if the people pay for it themselves. We don't always need the government to pay for everything, even with a low-income community, if we can find ways to drop the costs of items this drastically.

True, as someone who's struggled to make it in lower income areas I can tell you that neighbors depend on each other for little things like vacuums!

Quote from jdunn85 on August 21, 2018, 7:08 pm

True, as someone who's struggled to make it in lower income areas I can tell you that neighbors depend on each other for little things like vacuums!

Could you provide a list of different vacuum-like items that you think people would benefit from sharing? I'm curious to see how much savings we could come up with, and you might be able to come up with a more inclusive list than myself.

Lol math isn't really my forte friend, but I think you're onto a good thread of thought!  In the bigger picture, whatever tools that are available in bulk would be bought in bulk.  Therefore, maybe an intermediary could negotiate a discounted price.

Quote from jdunn85 on August 22, 2018, 12:11 pm

Lol math isn't really my forte friend, but I think you're onto a good thread of thought!  In the bigger picture, whatever tools that are available in bulk would be bought in bulk.  Therefore, maybe an intermediary could negotiate a discounted price.

I didn't mean do the math, just like what other items besides a vacuum could the community benefit from sharing?

EDIT: Great point about the bulk discount, though.

I had in mind stuff like landscaping tools, lawn mowers, hammers, tool sets with wrenches, electric screwdrivers, nails, bolts, ratchets, etc.  Things that are normally found in a contractor's commercial vehicle as well, like wood putty, caulk for seals, fire ant killer, weed killer, wasp spray, etc.

Quote from jdunn85 on August 23, 2018, 9:25 am

I had in mind stuff like landscaping tools, lawn mowers, hammers, tool sets with wrenches, electric screwdrivers, nails, bolts, ratchets, etc.  Things that are normally found in a contractor's commercial vehicle as well, like wood putty, caulk for seals, fire ant killer, weed killer, wasp spray, etc.

I hate to say it, but I think most of those are likely to walk off, and even if they don't I think circulation would be an issue.  Maintaining tool sets where people just have to walk across the aisle is something shops everywhere struggle with.  I think it'd be more maintainable to provide basic laborers for these tasks stocked with equipment as part of an internal jobs program.  Then the community could maintain something like, 5 sets of basic tools, a variety of specialty tools, and 4 laborers.  Jobs would be submitted and the laborers scheduled along with appropriate specialty tools.  Costs would be distributed among the community or perhaps subsidized externally.  It also opens the way for an apprenticeship program for more specialized repairs.

Quote from Idlepundit on August 23, 2018, 3:29 pm
Quote from jdunn85 on August 23, 2018, 9:25 am

I had in mind stuff like landscaping tools, lawn mowers, hammers, tool sets with wrenches, electric screwdrivers, nails, bolts, ratchets, etc.  Things that are normally found in a contractor's commercial vehicle as well, like wood putty, caulk for seals, fire ant killer, weed killer, wasp spray, etc.

I hate to say it, but I think most of those are likely to walk off, and even if they don't I think circulation would be an issue.  Maintaining tool sets where people just have to walk across the aisle is something shops everywhere struggle with.  I think it'd be more maintainable to provide basic laborers for these tasks stocked with equipment as part of an internal jobs program.  Then the community could maintain something like, 5 sets of basic tools, a variety of specialty tools, and 4 laborers.  Jobs would be submitted and the laborers scheduled along with appropriate specialty tools.  Costs would be distributed among the community or perhaps subsidized externally.  It also opens the way for an apprenticeship program for more specialized repairs.

Your jobs program is a good idea, but as to your criticism of the tool shed idea, you are thinking too in-depth IMO. Right now we are brainstorming on a very basic level for new ideas. If an idea is liked, experts will then take these ideas and find the best way to implement them, foresee the problems, and prevent them. Sure, if you just put a bunch of tools in a shed and tell anybody they can use them, especially in a low-income area, they are going to walk off, but that's not what would be done. Security measures would be put in place to help prevent these issues. Libraries are effectively the same thing but instead of tools they have books.

Building on the tool library I think a community garage would be an interesting idea.  I had heard years ago that a small community had a garage that could be rented  by the residence to work on cars using the tools in the garage.  This would be a wonderful way to allow people to do their own repairs or oil changes if they wanted to to keep down costs, perhaps there could be a mechanic on hand to give advice to those working on their own cars.  This could be expanded to children who want to do a repair on a bike such as changing the chain or bike pedals.  Learning to do your own work would be great for self esteem as well as expanding  on individual skills.

 

(Not sure why that is my thumbnail picture or how to change it? That picture was something my son had as his icon about 10 years ago on a gaming forum when he was into Spiderman?)

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